Sunday, July 23, 2017

Gorgeous Grandma Day

July 23rd is “officially” Gorgeous Grandma Day!  For those of you not familiar with “Gorgeous Grandma” here is what she is:

“Gorgeous Grandma” are woman over fifty, sixty or seventy who:



  • 1. Believes she has her whole life ahead of her, not her whole life behind her.
    2. Wants to get the most out of every day of her life
    3. Wants to thrive, not just survive
  • 4. Cares for her mind and her body
  • 5. Remains adaptable to life’s bittersweet as well as sweet
  • 6. Cherishes herself as much as she cherishes her loved ones
  • 7. Refuses to remain static – who is always open to learning, to new ideas, to new challenges and to new experiences.
  • 8. Loves life – and lets everyone know it!
  • 9. And for those single gorgeous grandmas – recovers after loss and learns to love again.



Golden Grannies



Saturday, July 22, 2017

Celebrating Blueberries



On May 8, 1999 Dan Glickman, Secretary of Agriculture of the United States of America proclaimed the month of July as "National Blueberry Month".

Spotlight on Blueberries

Blueberry Facts.
Blueberries are a native North American fruit produced in 35 States.

Fresh blueberries are available for about eight months of the year from producers across the United States and Canada. North America is the world's leading blueberry producer. The North American harvest runs from mid-April through early October, with peak harvest in mid-May through August.

Blueberries can be found in the market all year round, along with frozen, canned and dried blueberries.

Blueberries are low in calories and sodium and are a good source of fiber.

Blueberries rank high in antioxidants that help protect against cancer, heart disease and other age-related diseases.

Researchers have found compounds in blueberries that may help prevent urinary tract infection.

How To Select and Store Blueberries

Purchasing Blueberries
When purchasing fresh blueberries, look for firm, plump, dry berries with smooth skins and a silvery sheen. Check the color - reddish berries aren’t ripe, but can be used in cooking. Avoid soft or shriveled fruit, or any signs of mold. Containers with juice stains indicate that the fruit may be bruised.

Storing Blueberries
Refrigerate fresh blueberries as soon as you get them home, in their original plastic pack or in a covered bowl or storage container. Wash berries just before use. Use within 10 days of purchase.

Freezing Blueberries
Freeze unwashed and completely dry. Discard berries that are bruised or shriveled. Blueberries can be frozen in their original plastic pack or in a resealable plastic or frozen bag or transfered to freezer containerRemember to rinse them before using.

Serving Suggestions
*Add blueberries to your favorite muffin or pancake recipe.
*Combine blueberries with yogurt and granola cereal.

*Sprinkle blueberries over mixed greens.
*Serve blueberries with sour cream, yogurt or cottage cheese.

Celebrating Blueberries
During the month of July, we enjoyed the sweet flavor of blueberries in various recipes. Below are some of the photographs taken to capture their versatility and beauty.




Recipe. Frozen Blueberry Yogurt (low fat) with Fresh Blueberries 

Recipe. Blueberry Ices with Kiwi and Blueberries 

Recipe. Orange Sections and Fresh Blueberries 

Recipe. Blueberries with Vanilla Ice Cream (light),
Blueberry Ices and Frozen Blueberry Yogurt (low fat)

Recipe. Blueberry Crumb Ice Cream
with Fresh Blueberries
 

Recipe. Fruit Garden with Blueberries, Watermelon,
Pineapples, Grapes, and Kiwi

Resources
North American Blueberry Council. NABC, The North American Blueberry Council
U.S. Highbush Blueberry Council


July, National Ice Cream Month
Join Our Ice Cream Social

It’s fun, cold, delicious, comes in many flavors. Which one to choose? What meets your taste? Test the Brands, Read the portion size, check the calories and fat. An educated consumer has the knowledge to make the right decision. 

The third Sunday in July is National Ice Cream Day. Enjoy




Our Ice Cream Social

Toppings
Ice Creams

Finally
Berries, Light Vanilla Ice Cream,
Carmel Sauce and Whipped Cream
Nutrition Information. 212 Calories; 4 g Protein; 30 g Carbohydrates;
1 g Dietary Fiber; 9 g Fat; 50 mg Cholesterol; 71 mg Sodium
Blueberries with 
Blueberry Crumble Ice Cream
Nutrition Information. 151 Calories; 3 g Protein; 17 g Carbohydrates;
1 g Dietary Fiber; 9 g Fat; 46 mg Cholesterol; 26 mg Sodium
Raspberries with 
Red Velvet Ice Cream and Vanilla Wafer
Nutrition Information. 157 Calories; 3 g Protein; 18 g Carbohydrates;
1
 g Dietary Fiber; 9 g Fat; 49 mg Cholesterol; 59 mg Sodium

Kiwi, Blueberries and Strawberries with 
Carmel Delight Ice Cream, Light 
Nutrition Information. 131 Calories; 4 g Protein; 23 g Carbohydrates;
1 g Dietary Fiber; 4 g Fat; 30 mg Cholesterol; 46 mg Sodium

Nutrition Information


Scoop Size Matters


Heidi Diller, Registered Dietitian, 
has tips to help pick a delicious ice cream 
without busting your diet!

Cynthia Sass, MPH, MA, RD, CSSD describes 
"How to choose healthier ice cream"

From the table below you can see ice cream has a variety of calories and amounts of fat. I have never been a fan of no sugar added ice cream. However, the flavor of some of the light brands I found to match those of the regular and premium brands. Try some of the light brands and see what you think?



Resources


Baskin Robbins
Nutrition Information

Ben and Jerry’s
Nutrition Information - Click Ice Cream

Blue Bell Creameries
Nutrition Information - Click Ice Cream Links

Breyers
Nutrition Information-Click product for info

Good Humor
Nutrition Information-Click Products for Info

Häagen-Dazs
Nutrition Information-Click Product for Info








July is Sandwich Generation Month
“Three Generations Bound By Caring”


The Sandwich Generation is a generation of people who care for their aging parents while supporting their own children. It is a commemoration and celebration of dedication, patience and caring. The goal is to raise awareness of the tireless efforts of (and support available to) members of this growing generation.

Sandwich Generation Month is held every July and brings the community and families together to heighten understanding of the special needs of this generation. It also spotlights community support available to those working hard to maintain multi-generational families.

According to the Pew Research Center, just over 1 of every 8 Americans aged 40 to 60 is both raising a child and caring for a parent.

Sandwich Generation

Reference.
To learn more about the Sandwich Generation, visit the Sandwich Generation Resource Group.

Thursday, July 20, 2017

July 20, Food Highlights
Fortune Cookie Day and Lollipop Day



July 20, National Lollipop Day
Lollipops are what we call "Empty Calories." A food labeled as empty calories provide little to no nutrients, except calories. The calories in the "Dum Dum Pop" comes from sugar and corn syrup.

Food Network - Dum Dum Pops Unwrapped





Wednesday, July 19, 2017

National Hot Dog Day
Regulations, Safety and Nutrition



National Hot Dog and Sausage Council

How It's Made - Hot Dogs
U.S. Laws Regulating Hot Dogs
Food Safety
Hot Dogs and Nutrition
Hot Dogs and Sodium Nitrate
Choking risk
Commercials Then and Now

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce designated July as National Hot Dog Month in 1957. The National Hot Dog and Sausage Council (http://www.hot-dog.org) is an organization created in 1994 by the American Meat Institute and is funded by contributions from hot dog and sausage manufacturers and suppliers of equipment, ingredients and services. The Council conducts scientific research and provides information to consumers and media on questions related to quality, safety, nutrition and preparation of hot dogs and sausages.

What's In A Hot Dog by Joy Bauer


How It's Made - Hot Dogs  


U.S. Laws Regulating Hot Dogs 
A hot dog, frankfurter or wiener is a cooked sausage. They are made from beef, pork, veal, turkey, chicken, or a combination and the label must state the type of meat and other foods used.


Federal Standards of Identity.
1. Hot dogs may not contain more than 30% fat or no more than 10% water.
2. Beef or all-beef: Contains only beef with no soybean protein or dry milk solid fillers added.
3. Kosher: All-beef, usually heavily seasoned.
4. Frankfurter may contain up to 3.5 percent fillers and made from a combination of meats.
5. Turkey or Chicken Franks can contain turkey or chicken and turkey or chicken skin and fat in proportion to a turkey or chicken carcass.
6. If variety meats, cereal or soy fillers are used, the product name must be changed to "links" or the presence must be declared on the label. Hot dogs can be 15% byproducts; heart, kidney, liver or other organs. But it must be labeled.
7. Up to 3.5% non-meat binders and extenders (such as nonfat dry milk, cereal, or dried whole milk) or 2% isolated soy protein may be used, but must be shown in the ingredients statement on the product's label by its common name.
8. If a hot dog has a casing, or a thin skin and it is different than the meat used in the hot dog, the label must say so. For example, if a chicken hot dog has a pork casing, the label must list the pork casing on the ingredients list. If the casing is artificially colored, the label must indicate this
9. All ingredients in the product must be listed in the ingredients statement in order of predominance, from highest to lowest amounts.
10. To protect consumers against Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy, mechanically separated beef is considered inedible and is prohibited for use as food. It is not permitted in hot dogs or any other processed product. (Mechanically separated meat is a process whereby meat is separated from the bone by scraping, shaving, or pressing the meat from the bone without crushing, breaking or grinding the bone.)
11. Mechanically separated pork is permitted and must be labeled as "mechanically separated pork" in the ingredients statement. Hot dogs can contain no more than 20% mechanically separated pork.
12. Hot dogs can contain any amount of mechanically separated chicken or turkey.
 
A vegetarian hot dog is a hot dog produced completely from non-meat products. Vegetarian hot dogs are usually from some sort of soy protein, but some contain egg whites (not acceptable to vegans). There are also vegetarian hot dogs made from tofu.

Food Safety
1. Hot dogs should be reheated until steaming hot before eating, due to the threat of listeriosis.
2. If there is no product date, hot dogs can be safely stored in the refrigerator in the unopened package for 2 weeks; once opened, only 1 week.
3. Frozen hot dogs maintain their quality for about 1 or 2 months.
4. Do not leave hot dogs at room temperature for more than 2 hours and no more than 1 hour when the temperature goes above 90 °F.
 
Hot Dogs and Nutrition
The traditional hot dog is high in fat and salt, and contains very little or no fiber. Yet Americans typically consume 7 billion hot dogs during Hot Dog Season which runs from Memorial Day to Labor Day.

Below is a list of hot dogs, from beef, pork, turkey, low fat, no fat and vegetarian. Moderation, individual needs and preferences are key to planning your meals. If you are someone that eats hot dogs more than once a week, it might be wise to choose a lower-fat variety.

The analysis provided is based on 2 ounces cooked. It is important to read the label and check the portion size. Some of the hot dogs listed below were rounded up to 2 ounces in order to show a comparison of equal weight.




Hot Dogs and Sodium Nitrate/Nitrite
Many brands of hot dogs contain sodium nitrite and nitrate. It is used as a food preservative, flavor enhancer, prevents spoilage and helps prevent botulism. Sodium nitrite and nitrate occur naturally in some vegetables, fruits, grains, spices and water. In the 1970’s there were a number of studies that linked the consumption of nitrite with cancer in laboratory rats.

As a result, the FDA and the USDA commissioned a comprehensive review of sodium nitrite's role as a food additive. The results from the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) stated that nitrite does not cause cancer, although exposure to high nitrite levels in certain populations may be associated with cancers. The NAS recommended people's exposure to both nitrates and nitrites be reduced as much as possible without endangering the protection against botulism.

The meat industry made substantial changes in the past 20 years to address the concerns about nitrite in cured meats. It reduced the use of nitrite in the processing of cured meats and now averages one-tenth of what the regulations allow.

In a Consumer Report analysis, it was found that the nitrates and nitrites in all the hot dogs tested were well below the maximum level for the additives established by the USDA. A hot dog labeled uncured cannot add nitrates or nitrites, but that does not necessarily mean the product is free of them. The three uncured hot dogs tested contained nitrites and nitrates because the compounds occur naturally in spices and other natural ingredients added during processing.

As I reviewed the literature, it was clear the controversy over nitrites causing cancer still exists today. The American Institute for Cancer Research report found that consuming one 50-gram serving of processed meat (about one hot dog) every day increases the risk of colorectal cancer by 20 percent. According to the AICR, the average risk of colorectal cancer is 5.8 percent, but 7 percent when a hot dog is consumed daily over years.

Choking Risk
Policy Statement Prevention of Choking Among Children, American Academy of Pediatrics http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/reprint/peds.2009-2862v1 (pdf)
Hot dogs present a significant choking risk, especially for children under 14 years of age. Seventeen percent of all food-related asphyxiations are caused by hot dogs. It is suggested the size, shape and texture of hot dogs be modified to reduce the risk of choking. Pediatric emergency doctors note that a wedged hot dog is almost impossible to dislodge from a child's windpipe. To serve hot dogs safely for children, one should slice the hot dog into bite-size pieces. For adults it is recommended to slice hot dogs down the middle length-wise.


Commercials Then and Now

Hebrew National Hotdog Commercial

1978 commercial for Oscar Mayer Hot Dog Wieners. Hot diggity!


OSCAR MAYER, 1960’s

Nutrition.gov News

Dietitian Blog List