Thursday, November 23, 2017

National Cashew Day: Nutrition, Serving Ideas, and Recipes

Cashews are a good source of protein, copper, magnesium, phytonutrients, antioxidants, and heart-friendly unsaturated fats.


Nutrition Information

Recipes and Serving Suggestions


1. Eating Well, Healthy Cashew Recipes
2. Snack: eat alone; mix with other nuts and/or dried fruits
3. Add cashews to sauteed vegetables or salad greens
4. Sauté cashews with shrimp, beef or chicken
5. Add to hot cereals
6. Roast cashews
7. Use cashew butter to make a sauce for fish, vegetables, tofu or rice.



Nutritional Analysis Services

Ensure accurate and cost effective nutritional analysis for your recipes utilizing an extensive research database and 25 years experience. A great service for the Recipe Bloggers, Media, Cookbook Publishers, Writers, Chefs, and Recipe Websites. Your readers will enjoy and benefit from the Nutrition information.

For more information, visit Dietitians-Online Nutritional Analysis Services

contact:
Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN, LN, FAND
recipenews@gmail.com
954-796-7235


National Eat a Cranberry Day

Cranberries are naturally fat and cholesterol-free. They provide vitamin C, fiber, and manganese.  Cranberries contain proanthocyanidins, a type of antioxidant that may reduce the occurrence of urinary tract infections.

Nutrition Information.



Nutritional Analysis Services

Ensure accurate and cost effective nutritional analysis for your recipes utilizing an extensive research database and 25 years experience. A great service for the Recipe Bloggers, Media, Cookbook Publishers, Writers, Chefs, and Recipe Websites. Your readers will enjoy and benefit from the Nutrition information.

For more information, visit Dietitians-Online Nutritional Analysis Services

contact:
Sandra Frank, Ed.D, RDN, LN, FAND
recipenews@gmail.com
954-796-7235


Thanksgiving Day Special Edition
Safety, Healthy Choices, Vegetarian Ideas,
Singing Turkeys with a Message
and a Special Wish


Turkey Basics and Safety 
Learn the basics for storing, handling and preparing
 the holiday bird and prevent foodborne illness
.

The USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline
The USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline can help answer
your questions about the safe storage, handling,
and preparation of meat, poultry, and egg products.

Healthy Eating Tips for Thanksgiving


Controlling Thanksgiving Portion Size


Plan Meals Using
Portion Control to Minimize Waste


Vegetarian Thanksgiving Menu

Vegetarian Turkey

Protesting Turkeys
You Can't Gobble Me by the Turkey Singers.

A Thanksgiving Day Wish

“As we express our gratitude, we must never forget
that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, 
but to live by them.” 
– John F. Kennedy


May your Thanksgiving be filled with special moments,
happy traditions, and the love of family and friends.

warm wishes, Sandra and Jake Frank


Thanksgiving Song
by Mary Chapin Carpenter




Tuesday, November 21, 2017

National Stuffing Day - Triple-Herb Pumpernickel and Sourdough Stuffing and Food Safety




Fillers
Almost anything can serve as a stuffing. Many popular Anglo-American stuffings contain bread or cereals, usually together with vegetables, herbs and spices, and eggs. Middle Eastern vegetable stuffings may be based on seasoned rice, on minced meat, or a combination. Other stuffings may contain only vegetables and herbs. Some types of stuffing contain sausage meat, while vegetarian stuffings sometimes contain tofu. Roast pork is often accompanied by sage and onion stuffing in England; roast poultry in a Christmas dinner may be stuffed with sweet chestnuts. Oysters are used in one traditional stuffing for Thanksgiving. These may also be combined with mashed potatoes, for a heavy stuffing. Fruits and dried fruits can be added to stuffing including apples, apricots, dried prunes, and raisins. In England, a stuffing is sometimes made of minced pork shoulder seasoned with various ingredients, sage, onion, bread, chestnuts, dried apricots, dried cranberries etc. The stuffing mixture may be cooked separately and served as a side dish. This may still be called stuffing or it may be called dressing.

Food Safety
The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) states that cooking animals with a body cavity filled with stuffing can present potential food safety issues. These can occur because when the meat reaches a safe temperature, the stuffing inside can still harbor bacteria (and if the meat is cooked until the stuffing reaches a safe temperature, the meat may be overcooked). For turkeys, for instance, the USDA recommends cooking stuffing/dressing separately from the bird and not buying pre-stuffed birds. (Stuffing is never recommended for turkeys to be fried, grilled, microwaved, or smoked). The temperature of the turkey must reach a safe minimum internal temperature of 165 °F. Check the temperature in the innermost part of the thigh and wing and the thickest part of the breast.

Resources
1. Triple-Herb Pumpernickel and Sourdough Stuffing, Cooking Light
2. 
StuffingFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
3. 
Thanksgiving Stuffing Recipes, Cooking Light

Monday, November 20, 2017

November 20, Universal Children's Day - Resources from Around the World





The future of tomorrow are the children of today.

A review of organizations dedicated to improving the quality of Children's lives. Presented through songs, news reports, mission statements, and children.

UNICEF. Voices of Youth
Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Kids Eat Right 
Free the Children


Love Is All | Playing For Change


By resolution 836(IX) of 14 December 1954, the General Assembly recommended that all countries institute a Universal Children's Day, to be observed as a day of worldwide fraternity and understanding between children. It recommended that the Day was to be observed also as a day of activity devoted to promoting the ideals and objectives of the Charter and the welfare of the children of the world. The Assembly suggested to governments that the Day be observed on the date and in the way which each considers appropriate. The date 20 November, marks the day on which the Assembly adopted the Declaration of the Rights of the Child, in 1959, and the Convention on the Rights of the Child, in 1989.

In 2000 world leaders outlined Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) – which range from halving extreme poverty to halting the spread of HIV/AIDS and providing universal primary education, all by the target date of 2015. Though the Goals are for all humankind, they are primarily about children.


UN launches new drive to protect children
More than ever before, young people are recognized as having rights -
and as having an active role to play in asserting those rights.

WHO (World Health Organization). 
10 Facts On Nutrition

1. Malnutrition is a major contributor to disease and early deaths for mothers and children. Undernutrition, including vitamin and mineral deficiencies, contributes to about one third of all child deaths, and impairs healthy development. At the same time, growing rates of overweight are linked to a rise in chronic diseases. The result is a double burden of malnutrition.

2. An indicator of chronic malnutrition is stunting. This is when children are too short for their age group. About 165 million children globally are stunted resulting from not enough food, a vitamin-mineral poor diet, inadequate child care and disease. As growth slows down, brain development lags and stunted children learn poorly.

3. Wasting and bilateral oedema are severe forms of malnutrition - resulting from acute food shortages and compounded by illness. About 1.5 million children die annually due to wasting. Rising food prices, food scarcity in areas of conflict, and natural disasters diminish household access to appropriate and adequate food, all of which can lead to wasting.

4. Essential vitamins and minerals in the diet are vital to boost immunity and healthy development. Vitamin A, zinc, iron and iodine deficiencies are primary public health concerns. About 2 billion people are affected by inadequate iodine nutrition worldwide. More than one third of preschool-age children globally are vitamin A deficient. Vitamin A deficiency is the leading cause of preventable blindness in children.

5. Maternal undernutrition leads to poor fetal development and higher risk of pregnancy complications. Together, maternal and child undernutrition account for more than 10 percent of the global burden of disease.

6. For healthier babies, WHO recommends exclusive breastfeeding for six months, introducing age-appropriate and safe complementary foods at six months, and continuing breastfeeding for up to two years or beyond. Worldwide, about 20% of deaths among children under-five could be avoided if these feeding guidelines are followed. Appropriate feeding decreases rates of stunting and obesity and stimulates intellectual development in young children.

7. Nutritional problems in adolescents start during childhood and continue into adult life. Anemia is a key nutritional problem in adolescent girls. Preventing early pregnancies and assuring adequate intakes of essential nutrients for developing girls can reduce maternal and child deaths later, and stop cycles of malnutrition from one generation to the next. Globally, anemia affects 42% of pregnant women.

8. The rise in overweight and obesity worldwide is a major public health challenge. People of all ages and backgrounds face this form of malnutrition. As a consequence, rates of diabetes, cardiovascular disease and other diet-related conditions are escalating worldwide. These are very difficult to treat in places with limited resources and with already overburdened health systems. About 43 million children under age five are overweight, according to 2011 figures. 


9. Nutrition information is required to identify the areas where assistance is most needed. WHO released international child growth standards that provide benchmarks to compare children's nutritional status within and across countries and regions. 

10. Public education is another way to improve nutritional health. Starting in China during the Beijing Olympics, and continuing in other countries, WHO and Member States will promote "5 keys" to a healthy diet:
a. give your baby only breast milk for the first six months of life
b. eat a variety of foods
c. eat plenty of vegetables and fruits
d. eat moderate amounts of fat and oils
e. eat less salt and sugars

Resources

November 2010, the American Dietetic Association (ADA) and ADA Foundation officially launched their first joint initiative, Kids Eat Right. The two-tiered campaign aims to mobilize ADA members to participate in childhood obesity prevention efforts, and to educate families, communities, and policy makers about the importance of quality nutrition.

Mission: The Kids Eat Right campaign was launched to support public education projects and programs that address the national health concern of obesity among our children. 

To learn more about the Kids Eat Right Campaign visit:
Website. Kids Eat Right
Facebook.  Kids Eat Right




"Raffi" (Raffi Cavoukian), C.M., O.B.C. 
Founder and Chair, Centre for Child Honouring.

"Imagine a new idea as vital as democracy.
Now imagine helping it spread
quickly throughout the world! Child Honouring is one such idea,
an idea whose time has come.
 - Raffi

He is known to millions as "Raffi", a beloved songwriter and performer, author, ecology advocate and founder of Centre for Child Honouring. Child Honouring is a vision for creating a humane and sustainable world by addressing the universal needs of children.

Centre for Child Honouring and join "the compassion revolution."

Covenant for Honouring Children
 

Turn This World Around
Raffi's tribute to humanity's hero sprang from Mandela's call to global leaders in 2000 to turn this world around, for the children. In 2001, Raffi sang this for Nelson Mandela at Torontos Ryerson University. The song expresses the essence of Raffi's Child Honouring philosophy, a children-first paradigm for societal change. A child-friendly world enriches all of us, and offers the best chance to create sustainable cultures. All children want to live in peace and to follow their dreams.

As the largest humanitarian provider of school meals worldwide, the World Food Programme ( WFP), along with governments and partners, supports education, reduces malnutrition, and promotes development, especially during times of crises and emergencies.


Nearly all countries around the world have a school meals programme and about 368 million children from kindergarten to secondary school receive food at school every day. Governments recognize school meals as an essential tool for the development and growth of children, communities, and society as a whole.

WFP provides school meals to more than 20 million children every year. But many more children do not benefit from school meals, and in countries with the highest poverty rates where school meals would make a big difference, the reach of school meal programmes is far smaller. 

In WFP's efforts to create a world where educational and nutritional opportunities reach the hungry poor, schools are critical. It’s where we lay the foundation for future generations to grow and thrive.






Sunday, November 19, 2017

November 19, Carbonated Beverage with Caffeine Day

Though today we look at the caffeine in Carbonated Beverages, this is also an opportunity to view the caffeine in energy drinks that have been cited as the cause of some deaths and is currently being investigated by the US FDA. Some energy drinks contain 2 to 3 times the amount of caffeine found in soda.


How much Caffeine is too much?
Mayo Clinic

Up to 400 milligrams (mg) of caffeine, a day appears to be safe for most healthy adults. That's roughly the amount of caffeine in four cups of brewed coffee, 10 cans of cola or two "energy shot" drinks.
Although caffeine use may be safe for adults, it's not a good idea for children. And adolescents should limit themselves to no more than 100 mg of caffeine a day.

Even among adults, heavy caffeine use can cause unpleasant side effects. And caffeine may not be a good choice for people who are highly sensitive to its effects or who take certain medications.
5-Hour Energy Drinks: FDA Looks Into Caffeinated Beverage

Hidden Dangers of Caffeinated Energy Drinks


Caffeine (mg) based on 12-ounces Soda

Caffeine   Soda
  (mg)
 71.2         Jolt       
 69.0         Diet Pepsi Max 
 55.0         Pepsi One
 55.0         Mountain Dew
 55.0         Mountain Dew Code Red
 55.0         Diet Mountain Dew
 46.5         Tab
 45.6         Diet Coke
 44.4         Shasta Diet Cola
 43.0         Diet RC Cola
 43.0         Diet Dr. Pepper
 40.0         Diet Sunkist Orange
 37.5         Pepsi-Cola
 36.0         Diet Pepsi
 34.0         Coca-Cola Classic
 34.0         Diet Cherry Coke
 29.0         AW Creme Soda
 22.0         AW Diet Creme Soda
 0              7-Up
 0              Sprite, regular or diet
 0              AW Root Beer

National Farm-City Week - Harvesting Healthy Choices



Farm-City Week is celebrated each year.  The purpose of Farm-City Week is to bring about a better understanding between rural and urban people by increasing their knowledge and appreciation of each other as partners in progress.

Farm-City: Harvesting Healthy Choices
Statistics indicated that about one-third of American children ages 6 to 19 are overweight, and a growing number of young people suffer from cardiovascular disease, high cholesterol, Type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure.

Farm-City theme of “Harvesting Healthy Choices” gives farmers an opportunity to join forces with their city neighbors to show the healthy food choices available.


Harvesting Healthy Choices allows the opportunity to talk about the health benefits of locally grown produce and other foods:
- the bone-building power of milk;
- the leaner choices in beef, pork and poultry;
- the importance of folic acid-rich peanuts to expectant mothers;
- the cancer fighting properties of soybeans;
- the antioxidant power of blueberries 

What’s more, modern agriculture produces healthier animals, more nutritious grains and year-round access to fresh fruits and vegetables. Healthy food doesn’t just mean tofu and bean sprouts. A 5-ounce portion of lean beef or pork can be part of a balanced diet, and milk, cheese, bread and even fried catfish still have a place on Alabama’s dinner table. 

Eating well and living well are about choices – and is important to all ages in helping us create a healthier state. For more information on a balanced diet which includes fruits, vegetables, grains, protein and dairy products please visit the Department of Agriculture’s “My Plate” Nutritional Guide at www.choosemyplate.gov.

Resource:





Nutrition.gov News

Dietitian Blog List