Saturday, August 19, 2017

August is Family Meal Month
The Rewards are Amazing
Make the Time


Family meal time is an ageless tradition shared by people all around the world. Eating dinner together keeps the doors of communication open. It's a perfect time to show your children they are your priority. Studies have shown children who eat dinner with their families are less likely to use alcohol, tobacco and illegal drugs and more likely to develop good eating habits.
 


Family Dinner
Segment from World Report, April 2009
A recent family study conducted by Brigham Young University, quizzed more than 1500 IBM employees. The results show that families who spend time eating dinner together will encounter less conflict between family and work.

The BYU study appeared in issues of Family and Consumer Sciences Research Journal, The Wall Street Journal, U.S. News and World Report and Slate magazine. Dr. Jacob expressed the hope for society to value dinner time, and not allow things to interrupt it.

In fact, a multi-national study cited by the marriage and family therapy program at the University of Minnesota and its director, reports family meal time has a more positive influence on emotional and intellectual development in children and teens than sports or additional time in school.

Nutritious Meals for Families on a Budget



August 19 - World Humanitarian Day - Inspire Humanitarian Work Around the World


This year we are shining the spotlight on humanitarians around the world and profiling Humanitarian Heroes – people from all walks of life, who are committed to making a difference. World Humanitarian Day is an opportunity to celebrate the spirit that inspires humanitarian work around the world. Thousands of people across the globe are doing incredible work every day. But unfortunately some of them pay the ultimate price. This World Humanitarian Day, we honour those humanitarians who face danger to help people in need. We remember their sacrifice. Stand in support for those who risk their lives every day. 

World Humanitarian Day is a time to recognize those who face danger and adversity in order to help others. The day was designated by the General Assembly to coincide with the anniversary of the 2003 bombing of the United Nations headquarters in Baghdad, Iraq, which killed 22 UN staff. 

Natural disasters, conflicts and other emergencies threaten the lives and health of millions of people every year. In the middle of such crises, thousands of dedicated humanitarian workers strive to care for those who have been affected and support local authorities to deliver assistance. On World Humanitarian Day, WHO and other international bodies are highlighting the roles performed by humanitarian workers, and remembering aid workers who have been killed or injured while performing their vital roles. 


World Humanitarian Day offers the chance:

· for the public to learn more about the humanitarian community, what aid workers do and the challenges they face;

· for nongovernmental and international bodies and UN agencies, to demonstrate their humanitarian activities;

· to pay respect to those who have died or been injured in the course of their humanitarian work.

To show your support for World Humanitarian Day visit  
http://worldhumanitarianday.org/

Friday, August 18, 2017

Get Acquainted with Kiwifruit Month

sponsored by the California Kiwifruit Commission.

The Kiwifruit


History of the Kiwifruit.
Originally discovered in the Chang Kiang Valley of China, kiwifruit was considered a delicacy by the great Khans who enjoyed the emerald green color and wonderful flavor. By the mid 1800s, the fruit had found its way into other countries and was nicknamed the Chinese gooseberry. New Zealand growers started to export this exotic fruit to specialized markets around the world.

Then in 1962, a California produce dealer began importing New Zealand gooseberries. The dealer renamed the product "kiwifruit" because of its resemblance to the fuzzy brown kiwi — New Zealand's funny-looking national bird. By the late 1960s, California began producing its own kiwifruit in the Delano and Gridley areas.

How to Eat A Kiwi

There's no "right" or "wrong" way to eat California Kiwifruit. But since most people find that slicing and scooping is a good way to get the most from their kiwifruit, we coined the word "slooping" to describe it! Here's how to sloop your kiwi:

Using a sharp knife, slice the kiwifruit lengthwise to create two identical halves. Then use a spoon to scoop the sweet, delicious meat of the kiwifruit from each half. Looking for maximum fiber and nutrition? Don't throw that skin away! It's loaded with nutrients and fiber, so rinse it off and bite right in! 



The kiwifruit is a rich source of Vitamin C, Vitamin B6, Vitamin K and Fiber. It is low in calories, low in sodium, has no cholesterol and only a small amount of fat. 


One Large Kiwifruit, weighs about 3.5 ounces (100 grams) and provides the following nutrition.


Recipe from California Kiwifruit Commission.

Kiwi Mint Lemonade
Makes 4 servings 



If you don't have mint, try fresh lemon balm. The lemonade is also delicious without the herbs. 

Ingredients
1 cup (250 mL) water
 ½ (125 mL) cup granulated sugar
 ½ (125 mL) cup packed fresh mint leaves
 3 California kiwifruit
 3 lemons
 Sparkling water

Directions
1. In a medium saucepan, heat water with sugar over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally until sugar is dissolved. Simmer, uncovered, 5 minutes. Remove from heat and stir in mint leaves. Let stand 20 minutes.

2. Meanwhile, peel kiwifruit and cut into chunks. Puree in a food processor. Place puree in a pitcher. Strain cooled syrup into pitcher, pressing on mint, then discard leaves. Refrigerate until cold. Squeeze juice from 2 lemons. Stir into kiwifruit mixture. Taste, squeeze in juice from remaining lemon for a tarter lemonade.


3. Pour into glasses. Top with sparkling water. Serve garnished with a slice of kiwifruit. Makes about 2¼ cups (550 mL) without sparkling water, enough for 4 drinks.


For more recipes, visit the California Kiwi Commission.

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Back to School Nutrition
Resource Guide
Kids Eat Right Month

All over the country, children and parents are getting ready for the new school year to begin. With so much information about food and nutrition available on the Internet and in the news, Dietitians-Online has prepared the Back to School Nutrition Resource Guide.

Resources
Organizations, Associations, and Programs
School Nutrition Experts, Articles, and Videos

Graphics
Lunchbox Safety
Planning School Meals Using MyPlate












Resources
Organizations, Associations, and Programs
Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is your source for trustworthy, science-based food and nutrition information. The worlds largest organization of food and nutrition professionals, the Academy is committed to improving the nation's health and advancing the profession of dietetics through research, education and advocacy.

Kids Eat Right your source for scientifically-based health and nutrition information you can trust to help your child grow healthy. As a parent or caretaker you need reliable resources and you can find them here, backed by the expertise of nutrition professionals.
Home Food Safety Tips The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and ConAgra Foods public awareness campaign, Home Food Safety, is dedicated to providing home food safety statistics, information about foodborne illness and safe food handling information and tips.
Safe Lunch Guide
Choose MyPlate. The website features practical information and tips to help Americans build healthier diets.
Vegetarian Resource Group
Vegetarian Kids, Teens, and Family
Action for Healthy Kids, believe there are ways to reduce and prevent childhood obesity and undernourishment. Learn how Action for Healthy Kids is working with schools, families and communities to help our kids learn to be healthier and be ready to learn.
Healthy Children The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and its member pediatricians dedicate their efforts and resources to the health, safety and well-being of infants, children, adolescents and young adults.
Healthy Children - Nutrition
Food Allergies in Children


Team Nutrition Campaign launched by USDA's Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) to encourage and teach children, parents, and caregivers to eat healthy and be physically active every day. Eat Smart. Play Hard.™ is about making America's children healthier. It's about practical suggestions that will help you motivate children and their caregivers  to eat healthy and be active. Eat  smart. Play Hard.™ Campaign messages and materials are fun for children and informative for caregivers. 

 
We Can
The We Can! GO, SLOW, and WHOA Foods fact sheet (pdf) can be posted on the refrigerator or used when grocery shopping.
The We Can! Parent Tips - Snack (pdf) 100 Calories or Less tip sheet can help consumers choose vegetables, whole grains, and fat-free or low-fat (1 percent) milk for healthier snacks.
  Fruits and Veggies More Matters
Gearing Up for Back to School
National Dairy Council® (NDC)
Child Nutrition



 Fuel Up To Play 60 sponsored by National Dairy Council and the National Football League, in collaboration with United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Fuel Up to Play 60 is an in-school program that encourages the availability and consumption of nutrient-rich foods, along with at least 60 minutes of daily physical activity.
The National School Lunch Program (NSLP) is a federally assisted meal program operating in public and nonprofit private schools and residential child care institutions. It provides nutritionally balanced, low-cost or free lunches to children each school day. The program was established under the National School Lunch Act, signed by President Harry Truman in 1946.

The School Breakfast Program (SBP) provides cash assistance to  States to operate nonprofit breakfast programs in schools and residential childcare institutions. The program is administered at the Federal level by FNS. State education agencies administer the SBP at the State level, and local school food authorities operate it in schools.



School Nutrition Experts, Articles, and Videos

Dayle Hayes, MS, RD
School Meals That Rock (Facebook)
Dayle Hayes is an award-winning Registered Dietitian, author, and educator. Dayle developed a program for parents, FIT KIDS = HAPPY KIDS; created 5 A Day BINGO; and produced several videos. As a parent and member of the School Nutrition Association, Dayle is dedicated to improving school environments. She collected success stories for Making It Happen; wrote a chapter on communicating with students in Managing Child Nutrition Programs: Leadership for Excellence; and developed Enriching Family Mealtimes, a kit for school leaders and educators. In 2008, she co-authored the Position of the American Dietetic Association: Nutrition Guidance for Healthy Children Ages 2 to 11 Years.

Caroline, RD at Giant Eagle® 
Pack an A+ Lunch for School



Wondering What to Pack for School Lunches? Here are 15 healthier brown-bag lunch options now available in your supermarket. by Elaine Magee, MPH, RD

Back to School: Lunch Box Bootcamp Betsy Bingham Ramirez, M.Ed., RD

Feeding Vegan Kids by Reed Mangels, PhD, RD
















Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Kids Eat Right Month - Best Picks in a Vending Machine


August is Kids Eat Right Month, a new nutrition education, information sharing and action campaign created by Kids Eat Right, an initiative of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and its Foundation.

Remembering Julia Child

Julia Carolyn Child was born on August 15, 1912 and died on August 13, 2004. She was an American chef, author, and television personality. Child is recognized for bringing French cuisine to the American public with her cookbook, “Mastering the Art of French Cooking,” and her television programs, the most prominent of which was The French Chef, which premiered in 1963.

In 1946 Julia married Paul Cushing Child. The couple moved to Paris in 1948. In Paris, Child attended the Le Cordon Bleu cooking school and later studied privately with master chefs. She joined the women's cooking club Le Cercle des Gourmettes, through which she met Simone Beck. In 1951, Child, Beck, and Bertholle began to teach cooking to American women in Child's Paris kitchen, calling their informal school L'école des trois gourmandes (The School of the Three Food Lovers). For the next decade, as the Childs moved around Europe and finally to Cambridge, Massachusetts, the three researched and repeatedly tested recipes. Child translated the French into English, making the recipes detailed, interesting, and practical.


In 1961 the Mastering the Art of French Cooking was published and became a best-seller and received critical acclaim. The book is still in print and is considered an important culinary work. Following this success, Child wrote magazine articles and a regular column for The Boston Globe newspaper. She would go on to publish nearly twenty titles under her name and with others. 

In the 1970s and 1980s, Child was the star of numerous television programs, including Julia Child & Company, Julia Child & More Company and Dinner at Julia's. In 1989, she published a book and instructional video series collectively entitled “The Way To Cook.”

Child starred in four more series in the 1990s featuring guest chefs: Cooking with Master Chefs, In Julia's Kitchen with Master Chefs, Baking with Julia, and Julia Child & Jacques Pépin Cooking at Home.

Julia Child’s kitchen can be seen at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C. She will be remembered for bringing French cuisine to the American public and her dynamic cooking style and presentation in the kitchen.


References.
1. Wikipedia, Julia Child
2. PBS, Julia Child




Monday, August 14, 2017

August 14, National Creamsicle Day


Creamsicle® is a frozen dessert with vanilla ice cream in the center and a fruit sherbet on the outside. The classic Creamsicle® flavor is orange and vanilla, but today there are numerous flavors to choose from.

The term “Creamsicle” is a registered brand name owned by Unilever.

Creamsicles are available in several varieties, including 100 Calorie Bars, Low Fat Bars and No Sugar Added Bars.











GoodGuide is a business that provides information about the health, environmental and social performance of products and companies. Their mission is to help consumers make purchasing decisions that reflect preferences and values.
GoodGuide includes a team of scientific and technology experts working to acquire and compile high quality data, which then can be organized and transformed into actionable information for consumers.

GoodGuide Ratings (0 to 10, 10 the most favorable).

Creamsicle, No Sugar Added  5.9
Saturated Fat: Low
Cholesterol: Low
Sugars: Low
Sodium: Low

Creamsicle, Low Fat 5.3
Saturated Fat: Low
Cholesterol: Low
Sugars: Medium
Sodium: Low

Creamsicle, 100 Calorie Bar   5.1
Saturated Fat: Low
Cholesterol: Low
Sugars: High
Sodium: Low


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