Sunday, July 2, 2017

July 2, Made in America Day


Made in USA

Do you promote your products as “Made in the USA”? Under the law, some products must disclose U.S. content. For others, manufacturers and marketers who choose to make claims about the amount of U.S. content need to know about the Federal Trade Commission's (FTC) Enforcement Policy Statement on U.S. Origin Claims. Is your company up on what's required?


The Made in USA mark is a country of origin label indicating the product is "all or virtually all" made in the United States. The label is regulated by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC).

In general, goods imported into the United States must have a country of origin label unless excepted, but goods manufactured in the United States can be sold without any sort of "Made in the USA" label unless explicitly required. Voluntary claims made about the amount of U.S. content in other products must comply with the FTC’s Made in USA policy.

A Made in USA claim can be expressed (for example, "American-made") or implied. In identifying implied claims, the Commission focuses on the overall impression of the advertising, label, or promotional material. Depending on the context, U.S. symbols or geographic references (for example, U.S. flags, outlines of U.S. maps, or references to U.S. locations of headquarters or factories) may convey a claim of U.S. origin either by themselves, or in conjunction with other phrases or images.



Jobs are scarce and the government is encouraging companies to open up businesses in America. Why are Medicare dollars being used to purchase foods from Thailand and the Philippines?

How many jobs would be created if 
government programs were required to purchase items “Made in America?”

Resources

1. Federal Trade Commission Protecting American's Consumer
2. Products Made in the USA Directory, Made in USA Forever
3. 
Federal Trade Commission: Complying with the Made in USA Standard
4. Made in USA, Wikipedia









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